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Trail Map

ANNUAL SNOWFALL:
350 Inches
VERTICAL DROP:
2,600 Feet
SKIABLE ACRES:
2,000
LOCAL BARS:
Jimmy B’s, Face Shots and Grizzly Ridge
NUMBER OF LIFTS:
7
NUMBER OF TRAILS:
90+
NUMBER OF PARKS/PIPES:
1 Park / 0 Pipe
LOCAL RESTAURANTS:
Jimmy B’s, Grizzly Ridge
BACKCOUNTRY ACCESS:
Only through designated gates and access zones
TICKET PRICE:
$47
NEAREST AIRPORT:
Bozeman, MT
HOTELS/LODGING:
Few guest houses and condos on mountain – hotels in Bozeman

RESORT DESCRIPTION:
Experience big mountain skiing at small-town rates. Well known for incredible cold smoke powder and challenging terrain, this nonprofit community ski area is ranked consistently as one of the top values in the nation. The new Bridger Lift (triple chair) and reclaimed slopes provides continuous 1,500-foot vertical runs down the face of Bridger proper with no road cuts. Combined with the recent 311-acre Schlasman lift expansion in 2008, Bridger deserves to be on every serious Powder Magazine reader’s “must ski” list. With easy airport and interstate access to Bozeman only 20 minutes away, this is one of the best ski destinations in North America.

SEASON HIGHLIGHTS:

• 1/29: Skin to Win Randonee Rally
• 2/12: King and Queen of the Ridge
• 2/19: Bridger Gully Free Ride
• 3/5: Pinhead Classic Telemark Race

TERRAIN BREAKDOWN:

An expert skier’s dream with over 50 percent of the terrain black and double black diamond. The north-south running ridge provides a diverse range of natural terrain features with steep chutes, gullies, some glades and wide open bowls. Ridge has lift-served and hike-only zones. Excellent groomed runs on the lower mountain with a modest but well-built terrain park.

POWDER PERSPECTIVE:

Truly a “Little Area That Rocks,” Bridger Bowl is still all about the skiing. People don’t shout into their cell phones while riding the lifts. They don’t “tweet” their location. They just enjoy being part of a unique mountain culture that has persisted for generations, along with schralping some of the most challenging inbounds terrain found anywhere.


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